Posts tagged Torey Krug

Krug a Risk-Taker, and Always Will Be
Torey Krug ranks second on the Bruins through 14 games with five goals (Milan Lucic leads with seven), including three scored on the power play.
For offensive defensemen like Krug, there’s always a risk involved with jumping into the play. It’s a characteristic that has positioned him well, playing with a stay-at-home blueliner like Adam McQuaid. It’s often up to the forwards as well, to offer support when he pinches in, or dances his way from the blueline into the circles.
The young D like Krug, Dougie Hamilton and Matt Bartkowski all bring an offensive element to the B’s lineup. Head Coach Claude Julien has stressed from the beginning, that the trio has plenty of confidence in their play in the O-zone; where most of the growing pains will occur is on the defensive side of the puck.
Still, the Bruins aren’t playing it safe with the young defensemen like Krug as they continue to progress.
"You have to let the player play. I think you just let him play," said Julien, when asked about Krug pregame, as the B’s were prepping to face the Florida Panthers. "[Torey’s] game offensively is almost a natural part of it so you let him do that stuff. I don’t think there’s too many times where he makes bad decisions up front. If he does, it’s going to happen once in a while."
"There’s always a risk and reward; you want to minimize that risk. That’s what you want to do. But right now I think he’s doing well offensively so certainly not going to take that part of his game away from him."
"We’re going to try and tell him to clean up his five-on-five game, defensively, making good passes and not being sloppy in his own end."
"But offensively, I think he’s been a breath of fresh air for our hockey club."
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Krug a Risk-Taker, and Always Will Be

Torey Krug ranks second on the Bruins through 14 games with five goals (Milan Lucic leads with seven), including three scored on the power play.

For offensive defensemen like Krug, there’s always a risk involved with jumping into the play. It’s a characteristic that has positioned him well, playing with a stay-at-home blueliner like Adam McQuaid. It’s often up to the forwards as well, to offer support when he pinches in, or dances his way from the blueline into the circles.

The young D like Krug, Dougie Hamilton and Matt Bartkowski all bring an offensive element to the B’s lineup. Head Coach Claude Julien has stressed from the beginning, that the trio has plenty of confidence in their play in the O-zone; where most of the growing pains will occur is on the defensive side of the puck.

Still, the Bruins aren’t playing it safe with the young defensemen like Krug as they continue to progress.

"You have to let the player play. I think you just let him play," said Julien, when asked about Krug pregame, as the B’s were prepping to face the Florida Panthers.

"[Torey’s] game offensively is almost a natural part of it so you let him do that stuff. I don’t think there’s too many times where he makes bad decisions up front. If he does, it’s going to happen once in a while."

"There’s always a risk and reward; you want to minimize that risk. That’s what you want to do. But right now I think he’s doing well offensively so certainly not going to take that part of his game away from him."

"We’re going to try and tell him to clean up his five-on-five game, defensively, making good passes and not being sloppy in his own end."

"But offensively, I think he’s been a breath of fresh air for our hockey club."

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I didn’t even think about it until Looch looked at me and goes, ‘is that your first one?’

Torey Krug, after scoring his first regular season NHL goal in a 4-1 win over Detroit, his hometown team. He, of course, powered into the 2013 postseason with four goals in his first five playoff games.

"Yeah, I think I talked to Krech about it; he was like, ‘what should I do with the puck?’ I was like, ‘I don’t know, just give it to Zee, throw it in the corner for him.’ [laughs] You know he’s going to win the battle 9 out of 10 times so it’s nice to have him on our side."

—Bruins D-man Torey Krug, on playing the point with David Krejci on the power play (with Zdeno Chara in the net-front position) that generated two goals in their 4-1 win over Detroit.

Training Camp Officially Opens

With physical testing kicking off Boston’s 2013-14 Training Camp on Wednesday (before they hit the ice on Day 2), the players have worked themselves into their best physical shape, on and off the ice.

But, their mindsets need to be in order, as well. All of the physical tests take place in front of the B’s brass, so the sharpness and focus has to be in line.

"Oh man, the anxiety," Torey Krug said, when I asked him from a player’s perspective, what the emotions are heading into the first day of camp. "You prepare all summer. You know, I have so much confidence going into the testing that I’m going to do better than last summer and pass all of the tests, but there’s just something about it, with the management and coaching staff sitting there, watching the tests and it adds that little element to it."

"And your heart’s racing, and you expend a lot of energy. It’s a tough day, but everyone in here is prepared for it, so it’s something you look forward to."

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Whatever It Takes

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A popular phrase for the desperate team facing elimination in the playoffs is that they have “nothing to lose.” That desperate team is the Bruins tonight, at TD Garden, as they face Chicago in a do-or-die Game 6.

But defenseman Torey Krug wasn’t buying that phrase this morning, as he spoke to media following the team’s pregame skate.

"That’s a weird phrase, "Nothing to lose,’" remarked Krug. "We have everything to lose."

This isn’t a “go out and there see what happens” situation for the Bruins - this is a “go out there and make something happen” mindset for them.

"You go down swinging. You throw everything on the table," said Krug. "You do whatever it takes to get the job done, and that’s the mentality we have."

Read more of the Bruins’ pregame thoughts heading into Game 6: http://bbru.in/10OXd02

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Coach: Krug was “Magic”

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BOSTON, MA - Torey Krug was carrying the puck up ice from the Bruins’ zone five minutes into the second period, when all of a sudden, a new chant from the Boston faithful rained down.

"Kruuuuuuuug."

It was brief and low, but resonated throughout the building. ‘Maybe that was a “Looooooch” chant,’ I thought. After all, Milan Lucic was out on the ice with his linemates, and it was a familiar cheer within the walls of TD Garden.

But then it happened again, and again, and again…all the way up until Krug was standing near the bench for an interview in front of the crowd, following the Bruins’ 3-1 win over the New York Rangers that sent them into the Eastern Conference Finals for a date with Pittsburgh.

"Kruuuuuuuug."

Just over a minute prior to the first chant, the defenseman had lasered home his fourth goal of the postseason - his third on the power play - in just his fifth NHL playoff game. It’s the most by a Boston rookie defenseman since 1988.

The Bruins were down 1-0 early in the second period, when Tyler Seguin drew a hooking penalty. Over a minute into the power play, Brad Marchand skated the puck into the zone, controlled along the boards and fed the puck up to Seguin at the left point. The 21-year-old immediately sent a cross-ice pass to the 22-year-old Krug dancing through the right faceoff circle.

The one-timer blasted right past Henrik Lundqvist’s glove at 3:48 into the middle frame. It evened it up at 1-1, Krug threw his arms back and screamed, Seidenberg skated over with a smile, the power play unit converged, the Garden erupted.

"It’s a great feeling," said Krug, all smiles in the locker room postgame. "I’m glad we closed it out tonight in front of a great crowd. It was so loud in there I could barely hear myself think sometimes. It was a great experience."

I asked the defenseman after the game if he had heard the chants; with in-game mode turned on, he had tried to block everything else out except for his shifts (that, or he was too humble to admit it), but when we were about to start the interview near the bench, with fans waving their gold rally towels, he heard nothing but “Kruuuuuuug” raining down.

"He’s shown what he’s all about. We said ‘ice in his veins’ and that’s what he’s got," Bruins’ Head Coach Claude Julien said following the series-clinching win.

"You definitely have to balance that. Every game I’ve been able to take a step back before the National Anthem, look around, close my eyes, think about everything for a second, understand how special this is," said Krug, on taking in his first Stanley Cup playoff experience this series.

"With that, I just go out there and play my game and just try to contribute to the team in any way possible. Every game, I seem to find a way to."

"You always hope that guys can come in and help your team out," said Julien.

"There’s no doubt he was magic for us in this series. To score that many goals and show the confidence that he showed playing in this series is pretty outstanding."

It hasn’t just been Coach Julien’s comments to the media; the coach and his staff have shown confidence in Krug by upping his work load since Game One of the series, in which he scored his first NHL goal and was a revelation on the power play.

"It’s a good feeling out there, and the more the coaching staff puts me out on the ice, the better I feel," said the rookie blueliner. "It’s a great feeling when your teammates are coming up to you, patting you on the back - and all the credit in the world to everyone."

His teammates weren’t just patting him on the back. They were giving him plenty of praise postgame as well.

"Well, at first it’s like, ‘oh, another one for Kruger?!’," said Milan Lucic, who had his own power of a game, despite not showing up on the scoresheet. He steam-rolled a team-high six hits on the Rangers.

"But I think that’s when kind of everything got started for us and when you see a guy like him whose able to step in and play the way that he did in the series, I think it definitely lifts you up and makes you play harder because you see how hard he played and you try to thrive off that and you remember the feeling when you were that young and playing as a rookie in the playoffs."

Krug’s power-play tally knotted the game at 1-1, setting up Gregory Campbell for the game-winner just under 10 minutes later, at 13:42 into the second.

The Merlot Line crafted its own storyline throughout the series, netting four goals and two of the four game-winning goals to showcase the Bruins’ four-line rollout. But it was also the defensemen chipping into the offense, firing home seven goals and four off the stick of Krug.

"Those kids have stepped in, especially Freddy [Torey Krug], he played unbelievable, not even just the points. I’ve said it before, all the little plays he made, carrying the puck, having poise, having patience with it, making the smart plays, holding the blueline in the offensive zone and he played hard too," said Merlot Liner Shawn Thornton, who nearly had a Gordie Howe Hat Trick in the victory.

"He’s not that big of a defensemen, but he plays a lot bigger than he is."

"Any goal is huge, but that goal especially because, like I said, we were kind of in a lull in a little bit at one point during the game, and then we get that big goal to boost us up, and we go from there," said Krug’s fellow blueline "kid," Matt Bartkowski, who fell into a groove alongside Johnny Boychuk throughout the series.

"I think that’s probably the biggest storyline of the series is how they were able to step up and you see Kruger [Torey Krug] stepping up with four goals in a series, that’s huge," said Lucic, of Krug and the young defensemen stepping in when Dennis Seidenberg, Andrew Ference and Wade Redden were all sidelined before Game One against New York.

"It’s unbelievable, the poise he has with the puck," said Seidenberg of Krug. The veteran defenseman made his entrance back into the lineup in Game Five, alongside Zdeno Chara, after being out with injury since his first shift of Game Seven against Toronto.

"He’s got great skating legs and he jumps into the open areas. And you saw those one-timers he had the last couple of games. They’re very nice shots. They’re perfect shots. It’s nice to see a guy like Torey to play so well."

Even Rangers’ Head Coach John Tortorella showed his surprise at Krug’s emergence into the series.

"It’s funny how it works, huh? You get worried about this, that, and the other thing, and especially the kid there, [Torey] Krug, they got a lot of offense from their back end," said Tortorella, of facing a Bruins’ team that had been "depleted" on the back end, forcing the rookies to step in.

"That was another difference in our series, getting offense from the back end, and he led the way."

Krug certainly made an impact, and probably not to the surprise of the Bruins’ organization, who sought after the undrafted free agent following his four years at Michigan State University last spring.

"I decided to come here because I wanted to win. They expect to win the Stanley Cup every year, and that’s my mentality. I just want to win," said Krug. "Also, I knew I was going to make it to the NHL. There wasn’t going to be anyone that’s going to get in my way. It was just my mentality, so I’m glad I was able to come to an organization that has the winning ways that we do."

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Business as Usual for Torey Krug

BostonBruins.comTorey Krug has been a revelation for the Bruins in their second round playoff series against the New York Rangers. Stepping into the lineup because of a depleted defense corps, the 22-year-old Providence call-up scored a goal each in the first two games of the series – his first two career Stanley Cup Playoff games.

He has been solid in the defensive end, mostly playing alongside Adam McQuaid, and has shown his skills skating with the puck.

With Dennis Seidenberg, Wade Redden and Andrew Ference on the mend, and Krug and fellow blueliners, Dougie Hamilton and Matt Bartkowski playing so well, B’s Head Coach Claude Julien and his staff will have some decisions to make on the back end.

But no matter what, Krug will keep things status quo. Until that time comes, he will continue to play his calm, confident game.

Read the full feature by clicking here or on the link above.

Communication Leads to Calming Effect

NEW YORK, NY - The Bruins always preach about how confident and calm their steady goaltender Tuukka Rask is between the pipes. He’s always a “calming influence,” they say. But it’s not just the confidence the B’s have in knowing he will stop the puck nearly every time he sees it. The netminder’s communication with his teammates, primarily the defensemen, goes a long way.

"He’s one of the guys that never stops talking out there, so he’s comforting. He’s always talking to you, letting you know your options," said blueliner Torey Krug, following an optional skate Wednesday afternoon at Madison Square Garden the day before Game Four. Krug has now appeared in three NHL playoff games for Boston.

"The game is a lot easier when your goaltender is talking to you."

"Every time I go back for pucks, he’s in my ear, he’s telling me my options, even when I can’t see. It’s great. He’s a very confident, calm, collected goaltender back there."

"I know I have the ability to take risks that normally you might not take, but I know Tuukka’s back there and he’s going to make a big save for me."

That communication also translates to the defensive corps in front of him.

"The big thing is just talking," said Krug. "The more you talk, the easier the game is. Everybody’s talking a lot, Zee, Johnny’s in my ear all the time, Quaider’s a more quiet guy, but when we’re out on the ice, he’s yelling and screaming when I have the puck."

"I think communication is the biggest thing."

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Krug's First NHL Goal Couldn't Come at Better Time

BOSTON, MA – The Bruins have a bit of a trend going. In two straight games, they have gotten stellar play from young, call-up defensemen. And both times, one of those ‘young guns’ delivered his first career NHL goal.

On Thursday night, it was call-up Torey Krug's turn to score his first-ever NHL goal, in his first-ever NHL playoff game.

Just four days prior, in Game Seven of the B’s first round series against Toronto, Matt Bartkowski, playing in just his second career playoff game, tallied Boston’s first goal of the game - and the first NHL goal of his career - just over five minutes into the first period from the left faceoff circle.

Bartkowski was called up from the AHL affiliate Providence Bruins and stepped into a depleted defense corps, that saw Andrew Ference and Wade Redden sidelined. Just 37 seconds into that game, Dennis Seidenberg was done for the night with an injury of his own.

Read the full feature by clicking here or on the link above.

Bruins Recall Defenseman Torey Krug from Providence

Boston, MA - Boston Bruins General Manager Peter Chiarelli announced today, March 27, that the team has recalled defenseman Torey Krug. Krug will join Boston today (Wednesday) and be available to play in the team’s game tonight against the Canadiens at 7:30 p.m. ET.

Krug has skated in 55 games with Providence (AHL) this season and has registered 10 goals and 24 assists for 34 points with 33 penalty minutes. Krug is fourth on the P-Bruins in points, and leads all defensemen, and is tied for fifth in goals with 10. Krug’s 34 points rank sixth in the AHL among D-men.

Read the full release at the link above or by clicking here.